Out of It

by Ricky Lam

“I’m not even that creative.”

Whenever there’s a “creative” project assigned to the class, many people cringe at the sight of the adjective. Days leading to the final deadline, these few individuals consistently complain about struggling to come up with a solid product. I mean I understand where they’re coming from. It’s hard to come up with something that can be visually striking, compared to the rest of the class. It’s treated like a competition when it shouldn’t be. However, whenever the reasons behind it stem to not being creative, I lose sympathy for them. It’s a general statement that basically means, “I don’t want to make an effort with this project.” Now it’s just pure laziness.

(Ricky Lam/Studio Collective) 

(Ricky Lam/Studio Collective) 

The idea that someone doesn’t have creativity is not true. Everyone exhibits creativity in a certain way. It’s only because that term has generally been associated with the “artsy stuff.” Apparently, if someone isn’t an art or architecture student, then he or she isn’t creative. Or if someone can’t bleed out “Picasso,” it isn’t worthy. Just because someone lacks in the “artsy” field, doesn’t mean he or she isn’t creative. That’s based on skill, not on how someone utilizes their imagination to create a solid product. Creativity is not strictly based in the arts, despite being closely associated in the artistic works department. It depends on the specific field someone is in.

Everyone is good at different things. I mean, that’s how majors work. Generally, people decide to pursue in the occupation that they love. For me, I loved my past experiences in journalism so I decided to go that route. It’s all about finding that “sweet spot.” That’s where creativity thrives. The same can be said for someone who is a Computer Science major. I have absolutely no idea how to program a computer, much less function one at some points. However, those people understand coding language to the point that they can easily utilize it to create new programs. Sure, it might suck if someone decides to use their newfound talent for hacking purposes (sorry, I’m an avid fan of Mr. Robot), but it clearly represents the creativity they’re exhibiting. The term needs to stop being associated with the literal “art” factor and more in how you implement original ideas to what you love doing. That’s what true art is.

(Ricky Lam/Studio Collective) 

(Ricky Lam/Studio Collective) 

Even before that, it’s hard figuring out what exactly you’re good at. I had no idea that I would like journalism until I actually became part of a publication. Back then, I was the shy kid who didn’t exactly have a say in things. It was terrifying, imagining me working on a publication and actually get involved. I had to step outside of my comfort zone and tackle my new challenges head-on, and I regret none of it. Accessing that creativity involves getting “out of it” and trying new things. It doesn’t hurt to try out new opportunities that you’ve been curious in exploring. You might be lucky and end up loving a specific field that was never in your radar. It’s all about being open to the various opportunities in the world.

Creativity is something that everyone develops throughout their lives. You can tackle that “creative project” in many ways, utilizing the opportunity to show your talent to the world. The word, creative, does not only mean it has to be artsy. Don’t treat it like a competition. Instead, think of it as revealing your craft and implementing it into an end product. That way, your own creativity is able to shine. Unless you’re stuck in an art class and you have no idea how to paint. That’s your own fault.